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Bummer. It's sad that something that has a practical use has to be shut down because corporations aren't lining their pockets enough.

In the end though, something different will come out and the underground won't be stopped, just re-routed. I haven't seen anything dead stopped yet. People still share mp3, movies, games, apps. The only thing they've been able to accomplish is to take down the big dogs, and make the process start all over again until another program that accomplishes the same thing gets popular.

Damn those filithy lawyers. Too bad I'm trying to become one.

vox populi

who cares? it will still work on all movies already out and most movies yet to be released. if not, then AnyDVD and other software will pick up the slack. when will the greedy assholes learn? they'll never stop us from sharing and copying movies, no matter what they do.

btw, compusa has a sale on dual layer verbatims, $12 for a 3-pack. $4 a piece, through saturday. it's the best price you will find anywhere. get 'em while they're hot!!!

[email protected]#K THE RIAA, MPAA, BSA, etc.

vox populi

The king is dead. Long live the king.

DVD Decrypter 3.5.4.0
DVD Shrink 3.2
VobBlanker 2001

Learn them. Live them. Love them.

Mike M

What do you use VobBlanker for?

vox populi

VobBlanker blanks cells in the menus or program chains of a DVD. Thus, you can get rid of annoying previews, studio logos, ratings screen, encoder credit, and FBI warnings. Thus, you get a disc that goes straight to the movie or main menu when inserted in a player. I use it on all my back-ups now, because it streamlines the discs that much more. Also, you can often fit dual layer movies to single layer if you blank unwanted crap. Especially if it's a disc with 16x9 and 4x3 versions on the same side. Studios suck to put this junk on discs in the first place. Discs should go to the menu or movie with no extra annoyances.

Mike M

Nice, I'll have to grab that. Thanks

+ken

The EFF is trying, but they can't fight the influence the studio's have either.....

thanks for the VobBlanker tip!

+ken

Joe D.

Legally you have the right to make one backup copy of your own if you bought the DVD. How can you do that if they take companies like this away? Dang good program I use in in conjunction with DVD shrink to make backups of all our DVDs that way we get a scratch we are out less than a buck for a DVD-R I pull out the original redub and problem solved instead of having to find another copy for 5-10 dollars.

Mike M

Actually didn't they make it so you are technically not legally allowed to copy DVD's for ANY reason, even if you own the origonal.

you may be right mike... i know at the begining of DVD's now the fed warning says that unauthorized reproduction, even reproduction without the intent for profit, is prohibited. (or something along those lines anyway).

can anyone clearify?

PlungeBob


Well, this doesn't solve the problem, but it will give
you a chuckle:

When you use DVDShrink, you can select the image to use
when replacing a video in the disk image with a still
image. Go to the DVDShrink download page and grab the
modified FBI warning screen that someone posted there.

This way, when the warning pops up it warns you against
a list of actions that includes "shrinking" (but the
image looks normal otherwise)

Good for a laugh!

(but be warned that this image larger results than the
default image, which is smaller)

Lynn

Re request for clarification -- this is the problem with the DMCA. Under *copyright* law, you certainly are permitted to make a back up of something you already bought for archive purposes, or to listen to in your car, or whatever. That's fair use. But the DMCA prohibits breaking any digital encryption for any reason, and did not include fair use rights. Thus, it is perfectly legal to back up something like a videotape, because the decryption isn't digital and the DMCA doesn't apply, but it's illegal to back up the same movie on DVD, because that is encrypted digitally.

Do these rules do anything to prevent large-scale pirates from doing their thing? Of course not. It only punishes honest consumers who want to get the benefit of what they paid for.

(And before you bash all lawyers, try blaming their clients, like the overzealous, paranoid MPAA and RIAA. Lawyers don't do anything unless their clients tell them to, and there are also lawyers on the other side trying to defend consumer rights.)

Lynn is right on target. You can copy it under fair use BUT the DMCA says you cannot break protection to do it!

How many politicians voted this into law and NEVER even read the bill or understood what it really meant?

"It'll stop piracy? Okay, good enough for me!"

CaT

The movie industry will soon suffer from exactly what the music industry is now. You cannot battle the customer and make a larger profit. If it is made impossible to backup a copy which I own, I will not buy any more dvds.

Yes, I've used decrypter and shrink, even on an occasional rental that I like but would not buy. But I'm also in Columbia House and I go to K-Mart and I buy every dvd that I would buy anyway. I see this as being fair and honest. For now, decrypter and other programs still work. However, with each step the movie industry takes at preventing copying is a step I take toward deciding not to buy any dvds. They have declared war on the customer by not allowing backup copies. I will not buy something that can be destroyed by a scratch and I cannot backup. If I'm forced back to cable, so be it.

Rob Emmerich

I would give up DVD Decryptor and DVD Shrink for a DVD player that just plays the movie. I want to see an infomercial with that strectched face ugly dude and his kidnapped bingo playing audience yelling "Press play..and walk away". No long drawn out unnecessary menu screens and jumping lamps and multi-language warning screens. I don't even want to press play, I just want to put it in and have the movie start. And if you don't know what I'm talking about try putting in Nemo or Lion King or Beauty and the Beast 8 trillion times with your kids. I own those movies on discs with tons and tons of extras that never get watched, just copies I made of the movie. No stealing, no selling, just the movie.

vox populi

"Actually didn't they make it so you are technically not legally allowed to copy DVD's for ANY reason, even if you own the origonal."

Someone said, "There is no DMCA. It's just a bad dream."

BTW, to use VobBlanker, you need an unencrypted file rip of the DVD (not an image file). Set VB to skip menus and titles if you're not blanking them - to save time. Also, set it to "use input folder." The original files are put in a backup folder under that. For some DVDs, it takes a while to process, because the forced crap is in the same title set as the movie. Thus, the whole movie has to be re-read and re-written. Most studios put forced content in the VIDEO_TS menus and you can safely blank them, but preview it just to be sure.

I wish VB 2002 was a little more user-friendly, but you can figure it out if you read the help files and online documentation.

https://jsoto.posunplugged.com/vobblanker.htm

vox populi

"I would give up DVD Decryptor and DVD Shrink for a DVD player that just plays the movie."

Get a Daewoo player. Mine has an option called Auto Play that scans a DVD and plays the longest running program. It's usually the main movie, except with TV series where it may just be the longest episode. I don't know if they still have this feature - mine is about a year old. I'm fairly certain that most players don't have this option, since it probably violates the imaginary DMCA. My Daewoo will also play foreign region regions. Just hit display twice, then play or menu, when prompted to check region. It works like a charm on every foreign disc I've tried.

vox populi

"you may be right mike... i know at the begining of DVD's now the fed warning says that unauthorized reproduction, even reproduction without the intent for profit, is prohibited. (or something along those lines anyway).
can anyone clearify?"

IANAL, but I've read several places that nobody has ever been sued for non-commercial copying of DVDs. They have sued people for sharing on p2p networks. But it would be futile to charge someone with backing up a DVD and would alienate lots of customers (just like the RIAA lawsuits).

I say let those dumb fucks spend themselves into bankruptcy. There'll just be another program that takes over the market. Smart Ripper is up there. By the way, if you want to download the latest version v3.5.4.0 of DVD Decryper, before the mirrors are forced to take it down

https://www.afterdawn.com/software/video_software/dvd_rippers/dvd_decrypter.cfm

Is DVD Shrink next? I'll tell you why not. Because it's used mainly for DVD copying. MPAA is currently most interested in P2P, hence the stand-alone rippers, which are used in P2P sharing. But just in case, archive any piece of software that lawyers have their eyes on.

By "dumb fucks" I meant MPAA, not the DVD Decrypter

"[email protected]#K THE RIAA, MPAA, BSA, etc."

...and they can all KISS MY A$$ (including the BA$TARD lawyers that decide to make their money by suing to take away the rights of the people).

Btw...if you are part of the RIAA, MPAA, BSA, etc. or one of their BA$TARD lawyers, and you are reading this let me say I am sorry to you.


I am sorry because you have mistaken me for someone WHO GIVE A FUCK!

santino

i personally will continue using dvd-decrypter. i just bought anydvd. It's great and it's updated often. For those that are interested.. download the trialware of anydvd, go to decrypter settings, uncheck structure protection and chose ElbyCDIO in I/O tab. voila! Anydvd will decss/de-macrovision/de-arcoss for you and decrypter will do the rest (rip to your harddrive)

Long live decrypting!

vox populi

DEATH TO THE RIAA, MPAA, BSA, DMCA, AND DRM.
LONG LIVE FAIR USE, CRACKING, AND REVERSE ENGINEERING.

vox populi

With DVD Decrypter, you often end up with a better copy than the original. Example: "Die Hard" (Collector's Ed. and Five Star) both have a mastering glitch. When played on my PC using WinDVD 6, the audio drops out and playback pauses for a second at the change from Chapter 9 to 10. This isn't a layer break - that occurs in chapter 32. It is a mastering problem and also occurs when you rip with dvd shrink. With DVD Decrypter set to "detect mastering errors", the problem is fixed and the disc plays fine at that point. Many DVDs are defective like this, and could be fixed by re-ripping and burning with DVD Decrypter.

Also, Prohibited User Operations (PUO's) make many DVDs worthless. You can't change the audio or subtitles with the remote, you can't stop or pause or skip or rewind or fast forward. Some discs hijack your machine so you can do nothing but eject the disc. That is BULLSHIT. I'm not going to buy a DVD with that kind of crap. I'm gonna get it from Netflix/BBO/etc, rip it, and burn it. If studios want me to buy DVDs, stop putting DRM crap on the discs that hijack my machine. Make the movie play immediately when inserted in the player, or at least go straight to the menu and play immediately from there. No THX logos, studio logos, or ratings screens - just go straight to the movie in one step or less.

Most DVDs aren't worth buying, unless you have a Daewoo player that can jump right to the movie with Auto Play. Even then, you are stuck with the Prohibited Operations, which degrade functionality. I would have bought David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive" if Lynch wasn't such a total asshole - digitally censoring a frontal nudity shot, refusing to have chapter stops, and not allowing you to switch audio streams on the fly (you have to go to the menu and then start the whole movie from the beginning, with no chapter stops). What a useless piece of shit. It's not even worth the trouble of copying.

SCREW YOU, DAVID LYNCH - and other directors who tamper with movies (George Lucas, for instance). If you don't want to make a chapter menu, fine, but at least include 16 chapter stops or more. So if we have a power outage or want to analyze specific scenes, we don't have to go through the whole movie by fast forwarding.

Damocles

Don't get mad, get even. Stop buying DVDs and CDs. Get a good burner (Pioneer, Plextor, BenQ, NEC, LG Electronics). Stock up on Dual Layer discs while they're on sale - $12 for 3-pack of Verbatims CompUSA. Download DVD Decrypter 3.5.4.0, DVD Shrink 3.2, and perhaps AnyDVD (sadly not a freeware program like decrypter and shrink). Join Netflix and/or BBO and/or BB's Movie Pass and/or Hollywood's MVP.

Boycott the bastards until they bleed from every orifice. We have the power, not them. We don't have to buy the crap they sell. Download free online or through p2p. F&$k 'em.

"Legally you have the right to make one backup copy of your own if you bought the DVD."

Actually you don't. Legally you don't, although the MPAA would NEVER try and tst this in court. At this point it is an ethical issue, just like "time delaying" your rentals. Since both are claimed to be illegal by the MPAA.

My obeservation is a lot of people think that in either case the rights holders are geting a viewing fee and don't have an ethical problem with making a copy.

As far as DVD decrypter, the developer's problem was NOT that he allowed people to break the DRMA! His problem was a PATENT problem in using macrovision patented material in his code.

So when people above draw a line between VHS and DVD they are WRONG adn habve not been paying attention. Several companies devoted to removing macrovison from videotapes to make copies were also targeted and taken out last month!

In the end it is a meaningless solution. two days after decrypter went out easy to use new software was circulated that does the same thing

Damocles

"In the end it is a meaningless solution. two days after decrypter went out easy to use new software was circulated that does the same thing."

Can you please provide the name of that software, or at least a link or hint where to find it?

"His problem was a PATENT problem in using macrovision patented material in his code."

I see the game they're playing. Encrypt something, and patent the technlogy. When someone tries to remove the encryption for fair use, sue them for violating the patent.

CaT

There might be more possible ramifications here. Blockbuster and Netflix might suffer in business from this decision. Both companies, in my experience, have many dvds with moderate to heavy scratches. Many of these dvds will not play on a dvd player but can be saved on the computer w/decrypter and copied to play flawlessly. Does anybody think this decision will eventually cause numbers of people to cancel the dvd-by-mail rental market if dvds can not be copied for free by decrypter for use in this way?

Damocles

"Blockbuster and Netflix might suffer in business from this decision. Both companies, in my experience, have many dvds with moderate to heavy scratches. Many of these dvds will not play on a dvd player but can be saved on the computer w/decrypter and copied to play flawlessly."

Hear! Hear! I usually rip and play back through my PC, because I got sick of DVDs skipping or locking up in my player. I don't want to find out a disc is unplayable, after getting engrossed in it. By ripping it, I can see right away if there's any problem reading it (retries, or failures). Many DVDs can only be ripped after 75-100 retries with DVD Decrypter. And this is with a Pioneer drive, one of the best for reading scratched discs (along with BenQ and Plextor). Imagine how that disc would have played in a set top machine.

"Does anybody think this decision will eventually cause numbers of people to cancel the dvd-by-mail rental market if dvds can not be copied for free by decrypter for use in this way?"

They will never stop ripping. DVD Decrypter still works on every recent title, including "Closer" and "Hitch." You just have to configure it right. Aggressive removal of structure protection, detect mastering errors, max read retries, remove PUO's, Macrovision, etc. I've had no problems with any DVDs. Everything works fine. It'll take a long time before Decrypter is defeated, as many forum posters have already shown.

test

testing...
why is this page red?!?

DVD King

It appears someone has put both websites back up on:

https://www.dvddecrypter.r8.org
https://www.dvdshrink.r8.org

fwupow

The MPAA ba$stards want to control everything about how we view their material. If it were up to them, we would only be allowed to eat and drink the director's favorite snacks and touch ourselves only during designated wanking scenes.

dirtyandfez

Okay..How many dvds do I have to buy before they are trashed by my children because of the cheap arse discs..I backup a copy of all my childrens dvds because they just dont last the distance of continuous use and transportation. Then when they are useless I burn them again..Thanks heaps for dvd shrink and decrypter,,also ripit4me on the side...Youve saved me shitloads of moola..

brandy reinhardt

I'm not sure if the decrypter would work for this situation or not but in post secondary setting, Universities are required by law to provide access to all academic material. This becomes a problem for Deaf and hard of hear students when DVDs are not subtitled or captioned.

There is a software that can be used to subtitle these types of non-captioned DVDs. It is called Camtasia. However, when a DVD is encryped, Camtasia won't reconginze it. If the DVD could be decrypted Universities can teach tech how to caption the DVD thereby providing the access that the ADA requires them to provide. Even after having permission from the publisher/film maker, the University by law can't decrypt the DVD and create a captioned version. So which law trumps the other, ADA or the Chafee Amendment? When decrypting DVDs for the purpose of providing access to academic information, I think the ADA should trump.

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