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noe638

The two at a time unlimited is 14.99, not 9.99.

How much do the plans cost?
3 DVDs at-a-time $17.99
2 DVDs at-a-time $14.99
2 DVDs at-a-time Limit 4 $11.99
1 DVD at-a-time Unlimited $9.99

But I agree with him that you feel like you are wasting money when the movies sit there for awhile.

I never really used Netflix for kids movies because they want to watch them over again...instead we pick up movies and books at the library once a week.

Andrew Wickliffe

I couldn't believe this guy....

The Netflix "math"? You have to get and return six movies a month for it to be $3 a rental, which is the national video store average (at least it used to be). That's not a lot of movies, if you rent movies (less than 2 movies a weekend).

And his last problems, with the Netflix queue not reading his mind. I think doing a little queue maintenance takes just as much time as going to a video store.

gir

Yeah, I agree - the queue management thing is lame. Unless you're running completely on brain-dead auto-pilot, it takes like 2 seconds after you drop a DVD in the mail to check the top few movies in your queue to make sure you actually want them. And how much effort does it take, after you finish watching a movie, to stick it in the envelope and walk out to your mail box.

If this guy can't even work up the initiative to do those couple things, he must have million dollar late fees when he rents from a brick & mortar.

If you can't ever seem to find time to watch the movies you get, that's a legitimate reason to drop the service, but stop with the lame rationalizations.

Hunter McDaniel

Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who feel that the mental energy required to manage a queue is just more than they want to both with. Their reference point is cable - you just turn it on and there is always "something" to watch.

I've often wondered if Netflix could develop an automatic recommendations-based service for such subscribers, but it's not an easy problem. But I think they are going to need something like that to break beyond 10M subscribers or so.

corey3rd

I really hate grandstanders in the media. First off, because of this guy's gig, Netflix is a business expense. The $240 he's going to "save" this year from not being part of Netflix is going straight to his taxes to pay for a congress that wants to get rid of PBS funding. He's feeding the monster that wants to kill his job.

Do I really care that this guy regulates his children's video watching? Kids want things now! Well he should also be guiding his children's viewings by getting stuff that isn't part of a merch blitz? So that his kid can be entertained and not merely shown a gateway flick to a world of "I want that toy that I saw in the video!"

And this guy buys pay-per-view? How much are PBS weasels getting paid that they can afford to fling cash at pay-per-view? And shouldn't a man with his title be getting screener copies of new DVDs?

cfry

"For the Netflix math to pay off for me..."

The question is, did he actually do the Netflix math:

http://netflix.frogcircus.org/

I pay $0.84 per DVD with a $0.28 late fee every day except for Friday and Sunday. That comes to $2.24 if I hold each DVD at my house for 7 days.

Bulldozza

Yah, this guy is lost. He talks about instant gratification being necessary for a 3 year old. give me a break. and if you want to watch a movie more than once, then just hold onto it.

The one that gets me though, is that he talks about how good it feels to support local businesses. HA! Blockbuster and Movie Gallery are local businesses? They are corporations much larger than Netflix.

Regardless, it appears his liberal mind is confused and he's not sure who to cry for so he cries for himself. He had the service for 2+ years right? maybe he shoudl take a break and scale back to a lower amount or stop being a *** and put the calculator away and stop crying about pennies.

The benefit of netflix is the convenience, service, selection, and price and Netflix remains superior to video stores in all categories as far as I'm concerned.

nissel

COOOOL BLOG Guys....

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NetflixShill

"get and return six movies a month for it to be $3 a rental, which is the national video store average (at least it used to be)."

You pay less than $1 with unlimited in store deals like Movie Pass and MVP. I pay no more than $2, just on regular rentals. I wait for 99-cent coupons, 2-for-1 coupons, $1 days or Blockbuster Rewards rentals. That brings my average under $2 always. So I'd have to "get and return" more like 9-10 movies. Also, the stores have things that online doesn't (and vice versa, of course). They complement each other. It's not an either-or for me.

"how much effort does it take, after you finish watching a movie, to stick it in the envelope and walk out to your mail box."

I would never leave a DVD sitting in my mail box while I was out, unless it had a lock so only the carrier could open it. Many people have mail boxes out by the street, making it even easier for thieves to walk/drive by and grab some DVDs. Plus, I've found the service faster using a box inside the post office.

Scribe1964

This guy makes dropping something in the mail sound like climbing Everest. Is he SERIOUS? After reading his whole thing, I wonder if ever even signed up for Netflix.

CJ


And this guy's a PBS Host - seems sort of braindead to me.

It's all out there on his Netflix account - lists of what he's already seen (returns), what's out he wants to see (in queue), and what is releasing in the future (saved).

And most people drive (or bicycle like me) past one of those blue postal boxes at least several times a day.

Lame!

Scott

This guy can keep his pan-and-scan pay-for-view movies and overpriced Blockbuster rentals. I've been with Netflix since day one and have never been inclined to cancel.

E. Craig Crawford

Could I be any less interested as to why a PBS host quit Netflix? (No, I didn't bother to read his article) His reasons may be valid FOR HIM. But, it's not like half a million people are going to exclaim, "This guy has a point!", and cancel their Netflix accounts. Not even a hundred.

It seems to me that he simply lost interest in Netflix as one of the sources of his movies.

NetflixShill

"It seems to me that he simply lost interest in Netflix as one of the sources of his movies."

I lost interest in Netflix too. I quit a few months ago. Their throttling ways got to be too much. Blockbuster and Nicheflix provided much more honest service. I recently decided to leave Nicheflix and do Greencine, because they didn't have enough copies of things or the copies they did have were lost/stolen... But I will still use their a-a-carte service from time to time. They are phasing out the subscription service in the near future.

superfunhappy

"I lost interest in Netflix too. I quit a few months ago. Their throttling ways got to be too much."

Wait, you quit months ago? And you still comment, on just about every story, about how much you hate Netflix and their throttling ways? Really?

NetflixShill

"Wait, you quit months ago? And you still comment, on just about every story, about how much you hate Netflix and their throttling ways? Really?"

Are my criticisms less valid now than a few months ago? Not from what I've read. Anyway, I'll probably join NFLX again if they have a DVD I can't get elsewhere, or they decide to start being honest and fair. (Set a cap, and allocate on a 1st-come-1st-served basis.)

WeaselBuddha

As I wrote to another thread, SuperFunHappy, which you responded to:

"For those who would say: why do you care, you are no longer a customer? I like the idea of Netflix's service, I admire how Netflix changed the shape of the rental market, I'd like to be a customer again if the conditions were right. By standing outside and being a critic, I suspect that I ever so slightly increase the probability of that happening, just as those of us who spoke out earlier led to change in Netflix's TOS."

Many people have left Netflix because they feel they were treated unhonorably ( inhonorably? ). Voting with your voice and with your dollars is really the only way that you can influence the policies of a company.

Who do you respect more? Manual, an oft contributer here, who rails loudly, but continues to be a customer or NetflixShill who quits because he doesn't like the behavior ( who also seems to have good taste in movies ).

I stated before, if you want to change Netflixes behavior, the best way is to leave and explain why to them. Enough folks do it, and they will have to review their policy. Or at least some other company will see an opportunity to act differently - and they will get my business.

I left over a year ago, and, like NetflixShill, as far as I can tell, my criticisms are still valid.

FrankLev

I think the guy reflects what a lot of people feel and why churn (cancellation) is up. look at this weeks new releases. it doesn't even match rotten tomatoes list. just a big bunch of dvds that can be bought outright for $5.

video on demand is growing and the rental market falling for the exact reasons this guy is saying and the first few comments are the typical out of touch reaction.

the throttling and denial of premium new release to long stnading customers IS an isse and if anyone says it isn't, they are not being serious

WeaselBuddha

Never post early in the morning, the word I was looking for was dishonorably.

Has anyone looked at the Disney's MovieBeam service? I mean it is pretty interesting, it is an over the air service ( ABC and PBS, encoded in the blanking interval? ), it caches 10 just released to video movies a week, with a total of 100 flicks of supposedly DVD quality cached ( betcha it isn't, my guess mpeg4 compression ).

Depending on the studio the movie is released at the same time as the DVD or within 30 to 45 days later.

What they got wrong, and it surprises me, is the revenue model. It is a VOD model, just a supposedly quicker release cycle than cable's, 3.99 for a new release, 1.99 for "popular" film. More for HD content.

If they had set this up on a subscription model, it could have been a threat - now I suspect it is but another tech lemming destroyed by greed. Agreed it would also need some sort of content preference settings to appeal to the more out of the mainstream crowd.

When I was consulting, I did some work for Disney, greedheads all, but very smart greedheads, they had their own currency, the Disney dollar, and had expenses and base costs nailed to the penny. Queue ( as in waiting lines, and telephone holding ) management theory advanced leaps and bounds under their ever watchful eye. They knew to the penny how much money it would cost them to keep you on the phone one extra minute, and how often a parade needed to happen to distract you from waiting. Amazing.

So the question is, how did they so righteously blow this? Greed at studio level with profit sharing or alike? Did they underestimate the number of people who don't have cable or satellite, but want VOD? Gee, it would be great to hear their market analysis.


Additionally, I'm curious, how many folks would visit a video store that had say 50 new releases and 50 slightly older flicks, but in infinite quality?

Moviebeam can be found at www.moviebeam.com for an overview, take a gander at the current list of the 100 movies it has. "From Hell" the Hughes brothers abortion of Alan Moore's brilliant graphic novel was at the top of the release list, Munich is soon to follow....


NetflixShill

"Additionally, I'm curious, how many folks would visit a video store that had say 50 new releases and 50 slightly older flicks, but in infinite quality?"

Even a light user would soon run out of DVDs they wanted to see, with just 100. I ran out of titles I wanted at NicheFlix (or they ran out of copies), and they have like 4-5k. The ALC site still has some things I want, but I am less likely to rent there. It costs more, has a 1-week due date, and $1/day late fee. I have to want something pretty bad to deal with those restrictions and penalties, plus paying more than my $2 limit.

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