« MobiTV and AT&T Launch AT&T Broadband TV | Main | Apple Launches iTunes 7 with Movies; Previews "iTV" »

Comments

Rusty Ramrod

"There are many problems with movie downloads (DRM, DVD burning, etc.), but the biggest issue is a serious lack of content."

I would somewhat agree but perhaps right up there with content is bandwidth, especially as the distribution model matures. I know it is hard for folks who have had broadband for years to realize, but there are still huge areas without any form of broadband outside of (ugh) satellite and even within those areas that are served, still many who are too cheap or too tech dumb to get broadband.

Current DVD's have a rudimentary form of DRM (CSS, which I guess is technically copy protection but has the side effect of “managing” the rights of the customer who purchased the product, so I would call it a form of DRM) and other disc corrupting technologies to try and thwart duplication. Just like every technology ever made to prevent piracy, DRM will fail, repeatedly (For a recent example look at MS DRM which was recently compromised, and then compromised again within a day of the new code release, which BTW, was one of the fastest patches ever released by MS I hear.)

I was listening to a podcast today, they were talking about things that made my skin crawl, DRM wise (Micro payments, PPV, location-based variable payments, etc.)

I find it hard to beleive NF will ever offer VOD. But the fact is they are most likely working on the programming code to throttle VOD users right now. ;-)

corey3rd

NF doesn't have to worry because a majority of their consumers enjoy the pay $18 for as many titles as you can flip in a month. They don't like having to fork up four bucks everytime they want to get another DVD.

What blows me away is what people aren't talking about - how lame cable programmers have become. Every channel seems to be showing either CSI, Law & Order or Fifth Element.

type-cast

"NF doesn't have to worry because a majority of their consumers enjoy the pay $18 for as many titles as you can flip in a month. They don't like having to fork up four bucks everytime they want to get another DVD."

First, you are probably limited to 1 DVD per dollar - maybe less. Second, there are other alternatives that don't cost you $4 per DVD. Third, Netflix usually has poor availability for new releases. They also have sales tax.

Hunter McDaniel

So what is Netflix has poor availability for new releases? Most new releases are crap, just as they have always been. But every year there are a few new releases that aren't crap, and Netflix gives me 75-years worth of them to choose from.

In my view, cable is a good value if you measure based on how many hours the TV is "on". Netflix is a better value if you measure based on how many hours you really "watch".

Maybe it will change in the future, but this first generation of VOD offerings are just not competitive with Netflix in selection, price, or convenience. The only thing they have going for them is instant gratification (well, after a couple-hour download) if you just have to see "40-year old Virgin" TONIGHT.

gir

I think we can all agree, once someone figures out the last few feet (getting the signal to your TV), provides huge selection, makes it convenient, and gives it a compelling price, VOD will be a DVD rental killer. Heck, if they use a flat-price all you can eat model, this could be a cable killer.

But I think that's more than 10 years away (probably much more). Technical issues (bandwidth and the last few feet) will probably be dealt with within 5 years, but the studios will hold up on selection and pricing till there's enough new low cost media competition to threaten their business - and they might be able to forestall that indefinately if big media keeps buying up all the new comers.

corey3rd

VOD has one major problem - risktaking. How many times do you see a title you're curious about so you stick it in on the queue because you're a fast turnaround viewer. So if you like it, you like it. And if you don't, it's just one of the 20 plus titles you nabbed over the month. I did this with "Kill Yr Idols" which I thought was a documentary about the No Wave movement in New York City in the late 70s/early 80s. After 20 minutes of some interesting interviews, the focus changes to a bunch of new bands playing around NYC. I didn't want to watch it. Now if I'd downloaded this film for $4, I'd feel completely ripped off. But since I watched it that day and sent it out in the evening mail, I wasn't that upset. It's just one of 24 titles I got in that 30 day span.

VOD promises to boost narrowcasting amongst consumers.

type-cast

"So what iF Netflix has poor availability for new releases? Most new releases are crap, just as they have always been."

All movies were once new. New releases "have always been" mostly crap. Thus, most movies are crap. Does that about sum it up? This is old, therefore good. This is new, therefore better. "And other cliches." What difference does it make what most movies are, any way? There are still good movies made every year.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Sponsors

Third-Party Netflix Sites