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Crow550

Ugh! Screw these delays! Seriously.

Enough already! You can try this crap but we can wait. Not gonna increase sales in the long term.

No one wants to purchase as many flicks anymore! Renting on disc and streaming is what most prefer to do.

This isn't gonna change with delays. Get over the lackluster sales and embrace rentals.

Just like more & more is avoiding blowing the cash on Theaters and waiting for it to come on Home video.

Times are changing and so is media consumption.

Groggie

Agreed with Crow. Delays don't make me want to buy a movie. A movie isn't out until it is on Netflix. Basically, Give it to me for my 8 bucks a month or get nothing.

Walt D in LV

Hey, if it helps [the movie studios] to increase sales, I say go for it. That way, they make more
I, myself, don't buy DVDs/Blu-rays. Expanding to 28 day or even 56 day release window won't make me buy them, though I believe it would make a few others.

I figure, the movie comes out in theaters, one can opt to go see it. Maybe even when it gets to the dollar theaters. Then it comes to the stores to buy and to Blockbuster to rent. One could, and I sometimes do, get it there. Then it comes to Netflix and Redbox (I don't normally use Redbox myself). Finally, it comes to Netflix Streaming.

Lots of choices. Lots of opportunities.

Nate

I found this article, interesting read, seems to come from a marketing firm study:

http://faculty.insead.edu/marketing_seminars/sEMINARS%202011-12/Rahul%20Telang/Broadcast_window_final.pdf

Some interesting points it makes:
- Top 10% of movies make up 48% of total DVD sales.
- DVD sales increase 10% when the movie is "blacked out" from digital delivery like VOD, Itunes, etc.
- 55% of a film's total DVD sales occur in its first 4 weeks.

S

Netflix painted a big target on themselves by accepting Warner's outrageous terms.

Now you've got Disney - a company that wasn't interested in the windows - thinking they'd be stupid not to try.

moviegeek

Eventually Netflix has to grow a pair(like Redbox did to Warner) and say no more delays! I never buy anything blind and waiting 28 days won't change that.

Jv3030

I have had it with this. Streaming sucks so this has to stop. Do you think making people wait 28 days will help sales you must be on drugs if you think this will matter.

Ritch

Weren't we told by Netflix that the 30-day window was a good thing because it would allow them to buy more DVDs thus elminating the endless "long waits"? I still seem to have long waits on most new releases even with this stupid 30-day window so it's the worst of both worlds.

Nate

No, what they meant was the 28-day delay gives slysoft plenty of time to update their software Ritch :)

Crow550

All this does is increase the illegal ways people will get there content.

Then again don't most parents purchase the big Disney Titles for there kids anyways?

Why not create a $8 and or free with ads streaming Disney channel that has TV shows and Movies from the past and some recent stuff?

These old fossils need to get with it or get left behind.

Kale Barton

Why must Redbox be contantly credited with having bigger cojones than Netflix? Redbox was able to say no because-at the time, they had no other need from Warner Bros than their dvds, which they can now pay more from a 3rd party wholesaler...Netflix however, needs to maintain cordial relations with them because they operate a pay tv service that requires content, content that would be denied them if they anger a major supplier by refusing to respect their wishes (however misguided) for a delayed rental window. Let's see how bold they are with the Verizon streaming deal necessitating signing massive deals to obtain material for the new venture.

If I insult someone, step on their toes, call their wife ugly, say their baby looks like a troll and kick their puppy, then turn around and ask for reasonable prices for something I need from him, do you honestly expect that person to be happy and go along and sell it to me cheap??? Redbox did what's best for them and their customers, and Netflix did what was best for theirs.

Tvaddic

I wonder if Redbox will accept this deal, if they deny deals with everyone in Hollywood, then no one would accept their Verizon/Redbox streamig deal.

Show Me The Movies

Anyone remember the last company to ignore the 28-day wait? It was Blockbuster, and then they went bankrupt. Netflix made a decision to maintain their service long-term, what's wrong with that? If you need the movies sooner don't be cheap and go see it in the theaters.

wbad

Many Hacking Netflix posters may not buy a movie because of the wait, but others will do so and the studios know this fact. Some of those people have disposable incomes and won't wait until it come out on NF. The tightwads ($8.00 bucks a month NF subscribers or the "limiters") of course won't. Money talks.

It's a free capitalist country. Only in the good old US of A can someone say "lets put water in a bottle and people will buy it". That's why studios are doing it. Some people will pay and the studio don't care about the skinflints.

IMACynic

@Kale Barton
Your analogy is a little backwards. It's WB that is stepping on toes by asking for unreasonable (and frankly, ineffective) conditions for continued access to product. Refusing to accept an unreasonable request is hardly an insult.

@Show Me The Movies
Blockbuster had been fighting off bankruptcy for some time before the 28-day delay deals were demanded by the studios. Also, they avoided the delay by striking up agreements with the studios, not flat-out refusing.

As to the rest of you saying that this extended wait will increase sales, at least one studio admitted that the 28-day delay did not increase disc sales as they had hoped.

The people who want to buy and own discs will do so. It won't be that simple to convert the rest into purchasers. There are way too many entertainment options out there, so the studios no longer have the power to bully the public into buying.

I have only to look at my bookshelf full of 300+ discs that I rarely revisit for a second viewing to remind myself that owning most movies is a complete waste of money.

shthar

So now I have to wait a month to not watch it?

Kale Barton

@IMACynic
Yes it is WB that's being totally unreasonable with this strategy. But however unreasonable and ineffective this delay window is, Netflix simply is in no position to resist them. They need access to the Warner library for Instant Watch-even the older titles so many complain of. They need them more than Warners needs Netflix.
If Netflix goes against them, and WB cuts them lose, all Warners will do is simply mozy on over to Amazon or any other streaming service and sell the same library titles to them-and probably jack up the price on them, citing the loss of revenue from NF as the excuse. They win.

Nate

WB is one of the few (Maybe the only) that can still bully people. As big and as popular Netflix has become, they still need WB more than WB needs them. I got this from BoxOfficeMojo.com to further make my point,since the turn of the century here is where WB finished each year in market share:

2000 - 3
2001 - 1
2002 - 3
2003 - 3
2004 - 2
2005 - 1
2006 - 4
2007 - 2
2008 - 1
2009 - 1
2010 - 1
2011 - 2

Flip that to a studio like Lions Gate, who has yet to ever finish in the top 5. Hard to argue with those numbers, simply put Netflix needs Warner more than Warner needs Netflix. And lets give up on that bulk buy retail crap. Netflix has to purchase hundreds of thousands of discs, this would be next to impossible at retail and when buying bulk directly from the distributor you get them at a fraction of the cost. DVD-Only would require a price increase before they even think about trying it.

ClydesMP

Coincidentally, two of those years which were their weakest, had no Harry Potter film, and they'll be getting none of those. But it shows how skewed a list could be. One movie, like Dark Knight or Potter, sometimes two, can put you at the top, but that doesn't mean anybody is going to want to buy all the other crap releases you put out during the year. People will buy the blockbusters anyway, but you can't force them to tread to Wal-mart to purchase a copy of Catwoman or Speed Racer, whose budgets and losses took a big cut out their earnings during those respective years.

Nate

Right, WB is propped up by 1-2 movies a year. Potter, Dark Knight, Hangover Films, Sherlock Holmes series... to go along with standalone hits like The Blind Side, Inception, 300, The Polar Express, etc. Who needs/wants any of those titles, it's just Potter and Batman and then the rest are crap like Catwoman! Several of the above years WB had 3 of the top 10 highest grossing movies of the year. The examples above are just more recent hits, you roll back towards the turn of the century and they had the Oceans Eleven and Matrix franchises going full steam. To try and argue WB only has 1-2 decent movies a year is ludicrous.

Mrmanmac

Don't forget Warner's tie in to HBO and the The cable industry. Although I don't think Netflix is a threat to cable overall, It is a giant threat to companies like HBO, Showtime, etc..

Netflix is never going to get anything but very old library content from Warner for streaming. Anything new is going to be sent to HBO, and we all know how HBO feels about Netflix.

Luke

Maybe if Disney lowered the prices for there DVDs it would increase their sales - they are always the most expensive DVDs to buy and are Never on sale - delay all they want, I still wont be buying Disney DVDs until they make them cheaper.

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