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Comments

Chris Peplin

Wait, so the Roku player can use Watch Now in Linux, but I can't? There's no excuse now...

David

Chris,

The Roku box doesn't need the computer to work. You can use this even if you have a Mac. It connects directly to Netflix through your Internet connection, so it doesn't matter what OS you have on your computer.

Chris Peplin

Yeah, I understand that - I meant that I use Linux on all of my home computers and am unable to watch Netflix streaming video Since it only supports Windows XP with Windows Media Player.

There was trouble in the past suppporting Linux because it uses the Microsoft streaming video format (chock full of DRM), but since it's working on the Roku player (which it says here runs Linux), there must be a workaround.

Complication

The excuse for allowing the Roku running Linux to access the movies is that this is a "trusted" device. All parts are controlled and there is no user access to the internal software.

Having said that, I think it is only a matter of time before someone dumps the firmware and creates a Roku emulator. Hopefully this will NOT occur any time soon as it would likely sour the studios on releasing a wider array of content to Watch Now.

D'Argo

Roku may be a trusted device, but the fact that its running Linux seems to suggest that there is no DRM decryptor process running in the box (otherwise, Watch Now would be available on Linux machines). If that's the case, a simple stream ripper could be used to save a Watch Now flick unencrypted to the hard-drive. I'd be surprised if it were really that easy.

D'Argo

Roku may be a trusted device, but the fact that its running Linux seems to suggest that there is no DRM decryptor process running in the box (otherwise, Watch Now would be available on Linux machines). If that's the case, a simple stream ripper could be used to save a Watch Now flick unencrypted to the hard-drive. I'd be surprised if it were really that easy.

elving

The fact the Roku box runs Linux is irrelevant. The Roku box uses an NXP chip. The NXP chip does Windows Media DRM: http://wmlicense.smdisp.net/wmcomponents/

Badasscat

I wouldn't buy it BECAUSE it uses flash,...flash eventually fails(even SSD flash drives use a method of not writing to the same space all the time to avoid it).

Doug

Badasscat, my guess is he meant that they use flash memory for non-volitile storage, i.e the firmware and settings. I suppose it's possible that the box buffers downloaded movie data in flash memory, but it seems unnecessary when it could just use normal ram.

Jeff R.

@Badasscat

Hard drives fail too. Are the failure rates of quality flash memory significantly worse than hard drives?

Gir

Hard drive failure is usually measured in hours (MTBF - mean time between failures). Reading and writing data doesn't wear out a hard drive.

Flash memory is the opposite. It's solid state, so it'll last practically forever if you never use it, but using it wears it out.

That said, I agree with Doug. Flash memory is (almost certainly) only used for persistent storage, not for streaming video. You might wear it out if you change configuration settings a few trillion times, but not by watching movies.

generic viagra

The fact the Roku box runs Linux is irrelevant. The Roku box uses an NXP chip. The NXP chip does Windows Media DRM: http://wmlicense.smdisp.net/wmcomponents/

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