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Comments

JP

...and people want the government to take over health care too.... "Sorry Mr. Tumor, my shift ends at 5pm, please come back next month."

Alex

USPS is a quasi-government entity. The truck was late, I don't show up at McDonald's after they've closed and demand a sack of cheeseburgers. Supervisor was 100% in the right here.

And really, likening a late shipment of entertainment DVD's to health care, sorry bud that's a terrible analogy.

Sounds About Right


I would bet big money that Branda wins both lawsuits. It sounds exactly like the executive level Netflix modus operandi; the method of operating that remains hidden from the general public.

MCW

"Steve Swasey, a vice president for Netflix in charge of communications, said the company does not comment on pending lawsuits."

Geez, there's that many of them? Who could stay mad at Netflix, really? They're just as cute as a button!

JDoors

I've worked jobs that had closing times. I support the supervisor's "closing time means -- we're closed" position, 100%.

Same goes for opening times. No, you can't come in -- We're not open yet.

Too many people believe they're the exception, that rules (and laws) somehow do not apply to them. Well, go away. I have the keys and ... We're closed. :D

Outsider1

Wow what about offering great service to the customer. Netflix is one of the USPS biggest customers and for them to refuse a shippment of mail just because they were a few minutes late just sounds like a typical union worker who doesn't want to put a little effort into there job just because they don't have too.

Bambooben

I think he was right refusing the shipment too. USPS is talking about cutting days of delivery because they are out of cash, and this would have meant keeping people late and paying overtime.

And I wonder if they have looked to see why the driver was late. Wonder if he was sitting on his butt taking a break at 7-11, and should have been there on time.

aviationwiz

For once a lawsuit that actually makes sense. You miss the cut off time, it's late, end of story. It goes the next day. I agree with the (former) supervisor.

PublicSectorFan

What was the cutoff time? 6:00pm or 6:30pm?

“If I took the Netflix (shipments) I would have also had to take the others, and would never had been done by 6:30,”

Sounds to me like Netflix arrived after 6:00pm but prior to the 6:30pm cutoff.

Too many customers were in queue ( yeah I went there ) at 6:00pm and the supervisor decided to not accept any of the shipments since they could not be taken in prior to 6:30pm.

USPS Supervisor may have blown the call on this one.

Seth

"He later received a call from a Netflix employee, and then a second call from a Netflix executive. They asked him to order the processing center staff to take the DVDs, according to the lawsuit."

This does not bode well for USPS' lawsuit with Gamefly, in which USPS states they do not offer preferential treatment to Netflix.

This sounds very much like they offer preferential treatment to Netflix and when this guy quoted USPS policy to Netflix, USPS showed the guy the door.

S C

I deliver to a couple USPS vehicle maintenance facilities, and have gotten to them during breaks and lunch and never had a problem with them accepting deliveries.
If the normal person is on break the supervisor will jump on the forklift and empty my truck.
This Branda guy is a self centered idiot!

Chris O.

That is pretty damn dodgy that Netflix has enough leverage to get USPS employees fired for closing the doors on time.

frank22

They can decide to offer preferential treatment if they want. It happens in corporate America every day. The important customers are the ones that pay the bills. Branda has a right to leave if his dinner was getting cold or something, but he doesn't have a right to come back the next day. That is how it is where I work. I don't think the postal service should be any different. Many of the postal workers would not be there except for Netflix.

We want the LEGAL right to leave work on time no matter what AND keep our job? Grow up!

frank22

"For once a lawsuit that actually makes sense. You miss the cut off time, it's late, end of story. It goes the next day. I agree with the (former) supervisor."

If you are the owner of the company, then end of story, but you aren't. Owners many times decide to accommodate the big customers. If you are an employee you need to decide if you want to work for such a company or one that doesn't want to. As long as everyone has a choice than we are OK.

Tim

You're kidding, right? Has every poster here lost it? There's no way you can logically make up your mind about who is right and who is wrong from just one article. I mean, at the very least, the call logs from the phone company would prove him right or wrong but where's that info?

Seth

"They can decide to offer preferential treatment if they want. It happens in corporate America every day."

USPS is a quasi-governmental agency. I'm not an expert on what rules they have to follow, but it's not the same as a private company.

E

The USPS would have fired him for sure if the sorting wasn't done on time, right? It's always the little guy whose ass is on the line.

cg

Will have to wait to see more detail but if the higher-ups have said no payroll including overtime past 6:30 then turn the tables on the supervisor when a client complains, it will come out in court or however far this gets.

frank64

"USPS is a quasi-governmental agency. I'm not an expert on what rules they have to follow, but it's not the same as a private company."

SHOULD the rules be different because it isn't a private company? Rules preventing USPS from make normal business decision would contribute to their downfall, meaning loss of jobs. Let them run their company.

byteme

No matter which way you look at the decision made by the USPS supervisor, this makes Netflix look bad. Missing the deadline was the fault of someone at Netflix and they chose to use bullying tactics to try and force someone else to make up for their own mistake. In all fairness, since Netflix called for this guy's head, I hope they also fired the Netflix employee who was responsible for causing the shipment to miss the deadline.

banter

closed means closed. I support the fired employee and I hope the court does too.

Narcissus

I tried to buy Google on it's IPO date at $85 per share, but I couldn't stop staring at my reflection in the mirror long enough to call my broker. Now look at the stock price - $585.

I just called my broker to try to buy GOOG at $85 per share, but he said that I missed the boat. Doesn't anyone on Wall Street understand that the entire world revolves around what I want and when I want it?

GovtSucks

USPS is broke because they are mismanaged and also have a shit load of lazy carriers who slack off instead of work hard. If they show up back from their routes early, they will get more work handed to them - so instead - they don't work hard - they don't earn their pay and we the taxpayer suffer for it. The USPS can go to hell in a handbasket. The government can't do ANYTHING right.

Matt

People keep jumping to the conclusion that Netflix demanded he be fired - nothing in the article says that. It's also highly possible that the USPS fired him not because of pressure from Netflix, but because they thought he did the wrong thing.

I would have fired him too.

Netflix was only late by a matter of minutes. And as the supervisor said, he could have taken care of the Netflix shipment and still been off work on time (just not all three). Over 20,000 DVDs - 20,000 at 42 cents each, that's $8400.

If I had an employee that turned down $8400 worth of business simply because of a few minutes, WHILE still on the clock, AND could have still been off on time? Yeah, I'd get rid of him.

JoJo

"If I had an employee that turned down $8400 worth of business simply because of a few minutes, WHILE still on the clock, AND could have still been off on time? Yeah, I'd get rid of him."

Its not like they weren't going to get the money the next day. This is not lost business. NF is not going to take their business elsewhere because they got shut out one day.

frank64

"Its not like they weren't going to get the money the next day. This is not lost business. NF is not going to take their business elsewhere because they got shut out one day."

Kind of how cable companies work. Even if you are a monopoly you are better off not acting like one. People get mad. You can make that decision for YOUR company and the USPS can make it for theirs.

Kudos to Netflix for caring. You would think they would LIKE a day delay(they used to do it on purpose). They are a monopoly(in practice) and if those people didn't get their disks it isn't like they were going to cancel. I think if Netflix were running the post office our postage would be cheaper AND faster. I hope JoJo never gets to be management at Netflix! Ha Ha.

Hannah

"Its not like they weren't going to get the money the next day. This is not lost business."

Wrong. Yes, they'd get the business the next day. But those movies going out? Guess what, they're going to come back a day later too. The next ones are going to go out a day later after that, and so on. Everything from that point on is moved up by a day. It's a lost day of business.

Sock Puppet

If I had a nickel for every time some customer thought they were more important than another...

Netflix was in the wrong, and so was the USPS... Period... I don't care how much money they spend at the USPS.

The supervisor was well within his rights to refuse the shipment. 6PM was the cutoff, and the crew had till 6:30 to finish up their work. So Netflix shows up at 6:07 (along with two other late drivers) and the PO is supposed to bend over?

Netflix had better have fired everyone involved with making that shipment late as well. But then I bet their excuses were bought.

"Oh we had an equipment malfunction" or "Bob was off sick, and we were short staffed.."

frank64

What is this about rights? The supervisor has a right to quit or do what the management wants. Now YOU MAY disagree with the decision or how it went down, but there is NO right to leave on time, OR to have employment. You are MAKING up rights. YOU do not have the right to say how the someone else should treat an important customer. Companies are not run by voting and it is a good thing. They would be in a bigger mess than they are.

swan

"Its not like they weren't going to get the money the next day. This is not lost business. NF is not going to take their business elsewhere because they got shut out one day."

As a business owner that is horrible logic.You should never run a business on the assumption that not being accommodating is ok because the customer will always come back.

Jack of All Tirades

Let's see, 20,000 DVDs at $.44 a pop comes out to be $8,800 of business (potentially less if they're First Class Presort).

Yes, the driver could come back tomorrow, but you don't jerk around that type of customer - this isn't someone mailing one letter - this is more like an important business partner.

The USPS is facing billions in unfunded liabilities - think of the pensions there's no money for - if you're running a business, you don't slam the door on your customers - too many USPS employees act as you're there for their benefit. How many privately owned businesses would stay in business with this customer service model?

rjm

A SUPERVISOR should go out of his way to accomodate a large customer like Netflix.

He should KNOW that. An hourly employee, perhaps not. But a supervisor should know better.

The guy deserved to be fired.

If you own a hot dog stand and a customer wants a huge order 5 minutes after you close, you accomodate him. Its BUSINESS.

BP

Per usual I am absolutely appalled at the comments here. Not only do they prove that not a single person that reads this blog works in the real world where businesses make money and they get fighting mad when someone gets in the way of doing business, but they're the greatest case against supposedly high American literacy numbers.

I'm speaking, of course, about the fact that NOT A SINGLE ONE OF YOU have addressed the fact that he is suing Netflix for SLANDER - easily one of the most DIFFICULT cases to make in court. You lot are acting as if Netflix put a gun to his manager's head and said "Fire him!" His slander case is probably based on the fact that he believes Netflix lied about what exactly happened in an attempt to get him fired. He'll be asked to prove it and he'll be standing there like a chump and his lawyers will be grinning ear to ear because they get paid either way.

What's more disturbing is that not a single one of you has considered that maybe he has had past issues regarding performance, insubordination or attitude. We don't know the full story here. Maybe his boss called him after Netflix did and told him to accept the truck. Maybe his boss made the call to accept the truck anyway and was pissed his employee wasn't doing his job. Maybe he's a lazy prick government employee that does bare minimum and nothing more and one of his employer's largest clients was displeased with the way he handled a situation and his employer felt that by screwing up so badly they could no longer trust him and had to let him go.

Business is business. He made a bad call. Sometimes you have to bend over backwards for who you work for and I think what's really going on in these comments is a bunch of crybabies sticking it to "the man" because they're dissatisfied with their jobs and they're cheering on someone who did what they don't have the balls to do. Well, he got called on it, folks: he got fired, he's going to lose this lawsuit, and he's going to ruin his reputation all at the same time. Congratulations. You just made your life a living hell for the foreseeable future because you didn't want to stay at work an extra fifteen minutes that night.

The only reason this is news is because it involves the USPS, one of their largest customers and the loveliest of all groups, government employees - I'd be impressed if you could find me a larger group of lazy do-nothing crybaby leeches with entitlement issues. Outside of certain readers of this blog, that is.

BarkerJr

It is lost business, because that means the DVDs gets mailed back a day late, the next ones get mailed back a day late, and so on. Eventually someone cancels with one less DVD cause of it. That's lost business.

Fred

When our business closes we lock the doors and go home. The PO is still open doing work, what's the harm in taking shipments. That is problem with government workers, they follow the rules. And it's not the workers fault, it's the way the system is setup in all government facilities.

Seth

"I would have fired him too... Netflix was only late by a matter of minutes."

Well, Matt, this is really lovely. You've now put the employee in a position where he is going to get fired no matter what he does.

Violate policy and let the truck in? You're fired.

Don't violate policy and let the truck in? You're fired.

USPS is not a touchy feeley organization where workers are encouraged to take their own initiative. It is a rules and regulations oriented government agency.

The employee did his job just as he was told to do. You would have fired him and you would have had a very very hard time in court defending your decision.

Seth

"Per usual I am absolutely appalled at the comments here... Business is business. He made a bad call."

As I wrote above, employees at USPS are not paid for make "calls" on who to make exceptions for.

Joe

When I go to the post office to mail packages, I can arrive anytime before closing. The doors close at the given time, but anyone in the building is served, even if the line is long. This is how this should have been handled. Any truck coming there before closing at 6:30 (or whatever time is set) should be served, even if it takes longer to complete the job. That's called Customer Service.

Steve L.

Quote: "When I go to the post office to mail packages, I can arrive anytime before closing. The doors close at the given time, but anyone in the building is served, even if the line is long. This is how this should have been handled. Any truck coming there before closing at 6:30 (or whatever time is set) should be served, even if it takes longer to complete the job. That's called Customer Service.

Posted by: Joe | November 30, 2009 at 11:18 PM"

This seems to be the way of the world. If you're not used to it yet, then get there already.
Customer service is important to continued financial gain but so is adhering to the rules. Preferential treatment of one client over another leads to revenue from the one shown preference only. Can you see this sets it circling the bowl on it's slow, painful descent into obscurity?

danny

This is the fault of the netflix hub manager for not getting the mailers to the post office on time. All of them are aware that the post office has a deadline, and that the mailers have to be there by that time. 20,000 is not a lot. I'd be asking why it took so long for the mailers to get there. I mean, they started the day at 2 am, so... what happened? They must be trying to keep payroll low at that hub or something, in order to earn a bonus. I can't imagine why it took so long for 20,000 to get there.

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