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piper

Like I said before I have a USB Air card (5GB limit) for my main internet at home. Get some frickin broadband out in farm country. No Dsl - No cable - Sat sux - I am 3 miles from town.

Now maybe, just maybe they will fix this by 2030.

I wish I could stream.......

ok - I will calm down

PRTV

2030! That stinks, that's about the time I should be getting the next Blu-Ray disc in my queue;-)

Frank64

One DVD of HBO/Showtime had 2-4 shows, cost $4-$8 to stream from Amazon. Cost for Netflix DVD about $1. Same thing for movies. I want DVD's forever. If you stream everyone is rushing to stick their fingers in the pie.

If I paid for the DVD's I watch I might pay $60 a month. Getting close to cable prices.

PatB

This strikes me as being like all those quotes of Obama while on the campaign trail promising to broadcast health care negotiations on CSPAN - it sounded good at the time, but proved impossible to deliver when the time came.

The DVD is dead.

Try to buy a DVD player. Maybe you can still get one at Radio Shack, maybe not. I got an essentially new Phillips DVD from Craig's List for $20 to hold me while I waited for Blu-ray prices to fall. It has been used less than a year and works perfectly. I can't give it away.

Just a few years ago many enthusiasts collected DVDs. Collections of thousands were common. Those people are trying to give them away now. They will end up throwing them in the trash.

Some of my friends have all the premium movie channels. I don't. Still I have three or four HD commercial free movie channels all of which deliver a better picture than any DVD. Even NetFlix streaming in HD is has better pq than DVDs. I can also record a movie from an channel with commercials and then zap them out when I watch it. This constitutes another half dozen HD sources. They look better than a DVD too.

The market is changing. There are already a ton of sources with better image quality than that available from DVDs. Who wants to buy a lousy DVD of a new special effects blockbuster that looks worse than regular TV broadcasts? Soon Blu-ray will be the format of choice for all new releases. I wouldn't be surprised if Avatar is never released on DVD.

jim stevens

please help me understand why anyone with a quality blu ray player hooked up to a decent 5.1 sound system would want to stream movies that look like crap. i have fios 20 down 10 up speed so please don't tell me it's the internet connection
netflix hd streaming movies? where? when?
i honestly do not get this streaming is as good as a bd viewed properly? please help.
now if your idea of a quality bd movie viewed on some crappy 23 inch tv is the motherload, then i get it.

vio

The DVD is dead.

Try to buy a DVD player. Maybe you can still get one at Radio Shack, maybe not. I got an essentially new Phillips DVD from Craig's List for $20 to hold me while I waited for Blu-ray prices to fall. It has been used less than a year and works perfectly. I can't give it away.

Just a few years ago many enthusiasts collected DVDs. Collections of thousands were common. Those people are trying to give them away now. They will end up throwing them in the trash.

Truly one of the dumbest things I have ever read in my life. Proof positive that you can live in a fantasy world that is all your own.,

Dacker

And Kodak (my former long-time employer) said in 1995, that digital photography would not have much traction until 2010.

TG

PatB: " I wouldn't be surprised if Avatar is never released on DVD."

You want to put some money behind that statement.

/didn't think so
//Blu-Ray is really unnecessary unless you have a very nice television.
///and it will be a long time before streaming is the sole mode of delivery - 2030 sounds about right

PatB

The nice thing about predicting the future is that you know you are bound to be wrong. So maybe I'll be wrong in the ways that others here suggest - or maybe they'll be wrong.

I'm guilty of a bit of hyperbole. The DVD isn't really dead, but it is on life support. It is what is sometimes called a legacy technology. Responsible manufacturers will support it minimally for some time to come but they will not spend any time of money on further development.

This is exactly what happened with VHS. I had friends who built up very large VHS collections. Not me, as it happens, but I do have a lot of vinyl LPs and hundreds of CDs. All of these collections end up being worthless when the next wave of technology hits. I had a couple dozen VHS tapes. The video store wouldn't buy them back of course. The video store wouldn't even accept them as a gift. I could have possible given them away on craigslist but they went into the dumpster.

Last year things changed. All broadcast American TV became digital. CATV providers like Comcast quadrupled their number of broadcasts in 108i or 720p. Blu-ray players dropped in price by more than half. NetFlix started to stream 720p movies for free. Amazon started to sell streaming HD movies. Suddenly the 480i DVD didn't seem so special anymore.

In fact I am the kind of person who will be watching DVDs when everyone else has moved on. Almost all of my DVDs are opera performances usually filmed by someone in the audience. Typically these have truly terrible video. They will not benefit from Blu-ray. But I was speaking of the mainstream of the market.

Avatar was intended to combat Home Theater. It has already failed in this mission. The Blu-ray committee has already announced standards for 3D. A new Mitsubishi 3D projector has been reviewed at Projector Central. The rumors are that the major manufacturers will all release new 3D machines this spring. So it is likely that Avatar will be released in a couple months in a 3D format on Blu-ray as well as 2D Blu-ray. They may or may not bother to release a DVD version. I very much doubt if there will be a VHS version.

Have you noticed how hard it has become to get new LaserDisk movies?

TG

I absolutely, positively guarantee there will be a (2D) DVD release of Avatar. No question about it.

Greg Andrew

Hastings was clearly not referring to the DVD format when he referred to 2030; he was using DVDs to mean discs with movies. No one knows what the technical details of the discs in 2030. Blu-Ray will probably be long dead by then too, but whatever is around will still be referred to as DVDs

Paul

Hmmm, I bought a Samsung upscaling DVD player for less than $45 over Xmas, and it makes regular old DVDs look fabulous on my 1080p LCD. I'm still trying to figure out what I need Blu-ray and BD-Live for. Give me DVDs for another 5+ years and I'll be plenty happy.

robert

The comment about the upscaling dvd player-my ps3 does a nice job with blue ray, however you make a good point. Not every dvd looks significantly better in blue ray. Some older movies actually look worse because they look too good. Some special effects looks more fake with blue ray. Blue Ray is a total bust IMHO. The studios are desperate to keep dvd sales moving along. I think they will be forced in many cases to package refular and blue ray in the same package. You just cant keep wasitng shelf space on two formats with different pricing.

Seth

"Hastings was clearly not referring to the DVD format when he referred to 2030"

Right.

Cassin

Obviously didn't mean "DVD" 4.7GB discs. Many stores like Amazon and Netflix have BD's under category DVD with a note somewhere that it's actually the 25GB/50GB variety. So 200GB BD's can also be called DVD's and next generation discs can be called DVD's by this nomenclature too, but seriously people won't want the 4.7GB DVD's in 2020.

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